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Display information for equation id:math.629.3 on revision:629

* Page found: Definition:Hahn (eq math.629.3) (force rerendering)

Occurrences on the following pages:

Hash: 0823d0623a7109e103f4c3dda4a84761

TeX (original user input):
{\displaystyle Q_{n}}
TeX (checked):
{\displaystyle Q_{n}}

LaTeXML (experimental; uses MathML) rendering

MathML (648 B / 265 B) : Q n {\displaystyle {\displaystyle Q_{n}}}
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            <msub>
              <mi>Q</mi>
              <mrow class="MJX-TeXAtom-ORD">
                <mi>n</mi>
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    <annotation encoding="application/x-tex">{\displaystyle {\displaystyle Q_{n}}}</annotation>
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SVG (1.94 KB / 1.064 KB) : {\displaystyle {\displaystyle Q_{n}}}

MathML with SVG or PNG fallback (recommended for modern browsers and accessibility tools) rendering

MathML (0 B / 8 B) :
Failed to get svg.Failed to get png.

PNG images rendering

PNG (0 B / 8 B) :{\displaystyle Q_{n}}

Translations to Computer Algebra Systems

Translation to Maple

In Maple: Q[n]

Information about the conversion process:

\ChebyU: Chebyshev polynomial second kind; Example: \ChebyU{n}@{x}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/18.3#T1.t1.r5

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=ChebyshevU


\cos: Cosine; Example: \cos@@{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/4.14#E2

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=cos


\expe: Recognizes e with power as the exponential function. It was translated as a function.


\pderiv: Partial derivative; Example: \pderiv{f}{x}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/1.5#E3

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/Maple/view.aspx?path=diff


\Laguerre1: Laguerre polynomial; Example: \Laguerre[\alpha]{n}@{x}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/18.3#T1.t1.r12

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=LaguerreL


\HyperpFq: Generalized hypergeometric function; Example: \HyperpFq{p}{q}@@@{a_1,...,a_p}{b_1,...,b_q}{z}

Translation Information: Maple extract p and q from the length of the arguments.

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/16.2#E1

Maple: https://


\exp: Exponential function; Example: \exp@@{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/4.2#E19

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=exp


\EulerGamma: Euler Gamma function; Example: \EulerGamma@{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/5.2#E1

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=GAMMA


\Jacobi: Jacobi polynomial; Example: \Jacobi{\alpha}{\beta}{n}@{x}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/18.3#T1.t1.r2

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=JacobiP


\realpart: Real part of a complex number; Example: \realpart{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/1.9#E2

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=Re


\sin: Sine; Example: \sin@@{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/4.14#E1

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=sin


\HurwitzZeta: Hurwitz zeta function; Example: \HurwitzZeta@{s}{a}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/25.11#E1

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=Zeta


\pochhammer: Pochhammer symbol; Example: \pochhammer{a}{n}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/5.2#iii

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=pochhammer


\AntiDer: Anti-Derivative; Example: \AntiDer@{x}{f(x)}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://drmf.wmflabs.org/wiki/Definition:AntiDer

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/Maple/view.aspx?path=int


\RiemannZeta: Riemann zeta function; Example: \RiemannZeta@{s}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/25.2#E1

Maple: https://www.maplesoft.com/support/help/maple/view.aspx?path=Zeta


\RiemannXi: Riemann's xi-function; Example: \RiemannXi@{s}

Translation Information: You could use the alternative translation!

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/25.4#E4

Maple: https://


\alpha: Could be the second Feigenbaum constant.

But this system don't know how to translate it as a constant. It was translated as a general letter.


\cpi: Pi was translated to: Pi

\delta: Could be the first Feigenbaum constant.

But this system don't know how to translate it as a constant. It was translated as a general letter.


\gamma: Could be the Euler-Mascheroni constant.

But it is also a Greek letter. Be aware, that this program translated the letter as a normal Greek letter and not as a constant!

Use the DLMF-Macro \EulerConstant to translate \gamma as a constant.


\iunit: Imaginary unit was translated to: I

\opminus: was translated to (-1)

\phi: Could be the golden ratio == golden mean == golden section == extreme and mean ratio == medial section == divine proportion == divine section == golden proportion == golden cut == golden number.

But this system don't know how to translate it as a constant. It was translated as a general letter.


\pi: Could be the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter == Archimedes' constant.

But it is also a Greek letter. Be aware, that this program translated the letter as a normal Greek letter and not as a constant!

Use the DLMF-Macro \cpi to translate \pi as a constant.


cos: Function without DLMF-Definition. We cannot translate it and keep it like it is (but delete prefix \ if necessary).

e: You use a typical letter for a constant [the mathematical constant e == Napier's constant == 2.71828182845...].

We keep it like it is! But you should know that Maple uses exp(1) for this constant.

If you want to translate it as a constant, use the corresponding DLMF macro \expe


i: You use a typical letter for a constant [the imaginary unit == the principal square root of -1].

We keep it like it is! But you should know that Maple uses I for this constant.

If you want to translate it as a constant, use the corresponding DLMF macro \iunit


ln: Function without DLMF-Definition. We cannot translate it and keep it like it is (but delete prefix \ if necessary).

sin: Function without DLMF-Definition. We cannot translate it and keep it like it is (but delete prefix \ if necessary).


Translation to Mathematica

In Mathematica: Subscript[Q, n]

Information about the conversion process:

\cos: Cosine; Example: \cos@@{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/4.14#E2

Mathematica: https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/Cos.html


\realpart: Real part of a complex number; Example: \realpart{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/1.9#E2

Mathematica: https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/Re.html


\expe: Recognizes e with power as the exponential function. It was translated as a function.


\binomial: Binomial coefficient; Example: \binomial{m}{n}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/1.2#E1

Mathematica: https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/Binomial.html


\sin: Sine; Example: \sin@@{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/4.14#E1

Mathematica: https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/Sin.html


\pochhammer: Pochhammer symbol; Example: \pochhammer{a}{n}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/5.2#iii

Mathematica: https://


\exp: Exponential function; Example: \exp@@{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/4.2#E19

Mathematica: https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/Exp.html


\EulerGamma: Euler Gamma function; Example: \EulerGamma@{z}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/5.2#E1

Mathematica: https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/Gamma.html


\Jacobi: Jacobi polynomial; Example: \Jacobi{\alpha}{\beta}{n}@{x}

Relevant links to definitions:

DLMF: http://dlmf.nist.gov/18.3#T1.t1.r2

Mathematica: https://reference.wolfram.com/language/ref/JacobiP.html?q=JacobiP


\alpha: Could be the second Feigenbaum constant.

But this system don't know how to translate it as a constant. It was translated as a general letter.


\cpi: Pi was translated to: Pi

\delta: Could be the first Feigenbaum constant.

But this system don't know how to translate it as a constant. It was translated as a general letter.


\gamma: Could be the Euler-Mascheroni constant.

But it is also a Greek letter. Be aware, that this program translated the letter as a normal Greek letter and not as a constant!

Use the DLMF-Macro \EulerConstant to translate \gamma as a constant.


\iunit: Imaginary unit was translated to: I

\phi: Could be the golden ratio == golden mean == golden section == extreme and mean ratio == medial section == divine proportion == divine section == golden proportion == golden cut == golden number.

But this system don't know how to translate it as a constant. It was translated as a general letter.


\pi: Could be the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter == Archimedes' constant.

But it is also a Greek letter. Be aware, that this program translated the letter as a normal Greek letter and not as a constant!

Use the DLMF-Macro \cpi to translate \pi as a constant.


cos: Function without DLMF-Definition. We cannot translate it and keep it like it is (but delete prefix \ if necessary).

e: You use a typical letter for a constant [the mathematical constant e == Napier's constant == 2.71828182845...].

We keep it like it is! But you should know that Mathematica uses E for this constant.

If you want to translate it as a constant, use the corresponding DLMF macro \expe


i: You use a typical letter for a constant [the imaginary unit == the principal square root of -1].

We keep it like it is! But you should know that Mathematica uses I for this constant.

If you want to translate it as a constant, use the corresponding DLMF macro \iunit


ln: Function without DLMF-Definition. We cannot translate it and keep it like it is (but delete prefix \ if necessary).

sin: Function without DLMF-Definition. We cannot translate it and keep it like it is (but delete prefix \ if necessary).


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